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THE SURVEYING ACTIVITIES AT THE AUSTRIAN FEDERAL OFFICE FOR METROLOGY AND SURVEYING: AN ECONOMIC ANALYSIS
Title: THE SURVEYING ACTIVITIES AT THE AUSTRIAN FEDERAL OFFICE FOR METROLOGY AND SURVEYING: AN ECONOMIC ANALYSIS
Document type: REPORT
Document language: German (18 pages), English (approx. 40 pages)
Document (File or URL): Full text
ftp://amov.ce.kth.se/Common/LMVutred/Austrian_Report_Frank.doc
Abstract:

This study analyzes the surveying activities followed by the Austrian Federal Office for Metrology and Surveying (BEV). The BEV, a subordinate agency of the Austrian Federal Ministry of Economics and Labour, accomplishes two main categories of activities within the surveying area. One activity is concerned with the Fiscal Cadastre, which deals with the storage and administration of parcel boundaries at the national level and maintenance at the regional level. The second activity is the Topographic and Mapping Survey, which deals with the production and maintenance of topographic data with national coverage.
The study concludes that the Austrian Cadastre, namely the fiscal and ownership cadastre, is cost effective. The contributions of the users to the maintenance of the cadastre, via property and transfer tax, fees for registration of ownership change and mortgage, and revenues from cadastral data sale, seem to be adequate according to the nature and purpose of the cadastral system, i.e. the security and protection of the land owners’ property rights. The Topographic Survey covers broader and diverse data needs, from the public to the private sector, having defence a central role in the production of topographic data. The free access to topographic data seems to be appropriate, given that 75% of the users belong to the public sector. Additionally, topographic data access can contribute to the economic growth in terms of job creation, business opportunities, R&D growth, etc. The biggest impact of this recommended change will be at the level of the SME and the citizens, ending up with the confinement of these data to big business and government. This method of making public data available free of charge is believed to have contributed in the U.S. at the beginning of the 90s to the growth of the American economy, which has affected, in last instance, the tax revenues.